The Young Messiah Blog

In Theaters March 11

Inspired by Scripture and rooted in history, this story imagines a year in the boyhood of Jesus.

Remaining true to the character of Jesus revealed in the Bible, The Young Messiah is an inspirational story about the childhood of the Savior for the whole family.

When the mystery of Jesus’ divinity begins to unfold in His early years, He turns to His parents for answers. But Mary and Joseph, in an effort to protect their child, are afraid to reveal all they know. How do you explain the ways of the world to its Creator? How do you teach the Teacher? How do you help the Savior who came to save you?

Follow the young Messiah as He and His family take the extraordinary journey from Egypt to Nazareth and on to Jerusalem – where His true identity and profound destiny are revealed.

A Must-See Bible Movie About Jesus?

That's what Brian Godawa is saying. The man who famously sounded the alarm on Noah, citing it's anti-Biblical agenda, is now making noise in the other direction. Taking to his blog to extoll the greatness of the upcoming film The Young Messiah releasing in theaters March 11th.

I’m the guy who wrote the critique of the Noah script by Aronofsky that went viral and exposed its anti-Biblical agenda. I’m not a fundamentalist, but I represent and understand a significant huge proportion of the contemporary Christian viewing public who are totally okay with creative license when it comes to Bible movies, AS LONG AS YOU DON’T SUBVERT THE ORIGINAL MESSAGE. That’s what Noah did, and that’s what Exodus did. They subverted the Biblical narrative with their own paganism and atheism. And that is why they failed in terms of audience potential (along with just being plainly bad movies). Biblical fidelity is not about petty details, but about the meaning.

I am here to say that the new film coming out in March, The Young Messiah, is NOT one of those films. The Young Messiah is a great movie, well told, and very faithful to the spirit of the Gospel of what it may have been like for the young seven-year old Jesus to come of age as the Son of God. I highly recommend it for all Christians. It’s warm, touching and a beautiful portrayal of the chosen family struggling through extraordinary times and extraordinary difficulties with an extraordinary child.

Godawa goes on to say that Christians NEED to see The Young Messiah opening weekend in order for great, quality, Biblical films to be made in the future.


Be sure to get out and support The Young Messiah March 11th with your friends and family. Brian Godawa's full review of The Young Messiah can be read here.

Do You Know The Religious History Behind Mardi Gras?

Mardi Gras, literally means "Fat Tuesday" and has increased in popularity recently as a raucous, sometimes hedonistic event. But its roots lie in the Christian calendar, as a big, last indulgence before Lent starts on Ash Wednesday. That's why the huge celebration in New Orleans ends suddenly at midnight on Tuesday, with streetsweepers pushing festival-goers out of the French Quarter towards home.

Mardi Gras is less known for its relation to the Christmas season, through the ordinary-time interlude known in many Catholic cultures as Carnival. (Ordinary time, in the Christian calendar, refers to the normal "ordering" of time outside of the Advent/Christmas or Lent/Easter seasons.)

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Carnival is derived from the Latin words carne vale, which means "farewell to the flesh." Like many Catholic holidays and celebrations, it likely has its roots in pre-Christian traditions based on the seasons. Some believe the festival represented the few days added to the lunar calendar to make it coincide with the solar calendar. Because these days were outside the calendar, rules and customs were not obeyed. Others see it as a late-winter celebration designed to welcome the coming spring. It's recorded as early as the middle of the second century, the Romans observed a Fast of 40 Days, which was preceded by a brief season of feasting, costumes and merrymaking.

The Carnival season starts off with the Epiphany, which falls on January 6, 12 days after Christmas. It celebrates the visit of the Wise Men bearing gifts for the infant Jesus. In cultures that celebrate Carnival, Epiphany kicks off a series of celebrations that lead up to Mardi Gras.

Epiphany is also traditionally when King's Cake is served, a custom that began in France in the 12th century. It's believed that the cakes were made in a circle to represent the circular routes that the Wise Men took to find Jesus, in order to confuse King Herod and foil his plans of killing Jesus as a boy. In the early days, a coin or bean was hidden inside the cake, and whoever found the item was said to have good luck in the coming year. In Louisiana, bakers now put a small baby, representing the Christ Child, in the cake; the recipient is then expected to host the next King Cake party.

There are well-known season-long Carnival celebrations in Europe and Latin America, including Nice, France; Cologne, Germany; and Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The best-known celebration in the U.S. is in New Orleans and the French-Catholic communities of the Gulf Coast. Mardi Gras was first celebrated in the New World in 1699, when a French explorer arrived at the Mississippi River, about 60 miles south of present day New Orleans. He named the spot Point du Mardi Gras because he knew the holiday was being celebrated in his native country that day.

Eventually the French in New Orleans celebrated Mardi Gras with masked balls and parties, until the Spanish government took over in the mid-1700s and banned the celebrations. The ban continued even after the U.S. government acquired the land but the celebrations resumed in 1827. The official colors of Mardi Gras, with their roots in Catholicism, were chosen 10 years later: purple, a symbol of justice; green, representing faith; and gold, to signify power.

Mardi Gras literally means "Fat Tuesday" in French. The name is born out of the tradition of slaughtering and feasting upon a fattened calf on the last day of Carnival. The day is also known as Pancake Tuesday, Shrove Tuesday, and fetter Dienstag. The custom of making pancakes comes from the need to use up fat, eggs and dairy before the fasting and abstinence of Lent begins.